Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? 

An abdominal aortic aneurysm, also called AAA or triple A, is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of the aorta (the largest artery in the body) resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning greater than 50 percent of the vessel's normal diameter (width). 

The most common location of arterial aneurysm formation is the abdominal aorta, specifically, the segment of the abdominal aorta below the kidneys. An abdominal aneurysm located below the kidneys is called an infrarenal aneurysm. An aneurysm can be characterized by its location, shape, and cause.

The shape of an aneurysm is described as being fusiform or saccular which helps to identify a true aneurysm. The more common fusiform-shaped aneurysm bulges or balloons out on all sides of the aorta. A saccular-shaped aneurysm bulges or balloons out only on one side.

A pseudoaneurysm, or false aneurysm, is not an enlargement of any of the layers of the blood vessel wall. A false aneurysm may be the result of a prior surgery or trauma. Sometimes, a tear can occur on the inside layer of the vessel resulting in blood filling in between the layers of the blood vessel wall creating a dissection. 

The larger the aneurysm becomes, the greater the risk for rupture.

Because an aneurysm may continue to increase in size, along with progressive weakening of the artery wall, surgical intervention may be needed. Preventing rupture of an aneurysm is one of the goals of therapy. 

 

What causes an abdominal aortic aneurysm to form? 

An abdominal aortic aneurysm may be caused by multiple factors that result in the breaking down of the well-organized structural components (proteins) of the aortic wall that provide support and stabilize the wall. The exact cause isn't fully known.

Atherosclerosis (a build up of plaque, which is a deposit of fatty substances, cholesterol, cellular waste products, calcium, and fibrin in the inner lining of an artery) is thought to play an important role in aneurysmal disease, including the risk factors associated with atherosclerosis, such as:

  • Age (older than age 60)
  • Male (occurrence in males is four to five times greater than that of females)
  • Family history (first degree relatives such as father or brother)
  • Genetic factors
  • Hyperlipidemia (elevated fats in the blood)
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Smoking
  • Diabetes

Other diseases that may cause an abdominal aneurysm include:

  • Genetic disorders of connective tissue (abnormalities that can affect tissues such as bones, cartilage, heart, and blood vessels), such as Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Turner's syndrome, and polycystic kidney disease
  • Congenital (present at birth) syndromes, such as bicuspid aortic valve or coarctation of the aorta
  • Giant cell arteritis (a disease that causes inflammation of the temporal arteries and other arteries in the head and neck, causing the arteries to narrow, reducing blood flow in the affected areas; may cause persistent headaches and vision loss)
  • Trauma

Infectious aortitis (infections of the aorta) due to infections such as syphilis, salmonella, or staphylococcus. These infectious conditions are rare 

 

What are the symptoms of abdominal aortic aneurysms?

Abdominal aortic aneurysms may be asymptomatic (without symptoms) or symptomatic (with symptoms).

About three of every four abdominal aortic aneurysms are asymptomatic. An aneurysm may also be discovered by X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is being done for other conditions. Since abdominal aneurysm may be present without symptoms, it's referred to as the "silent killer" because it may rupture before being diagnosed.

Pain is the most common symptom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The pain associated with an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be located in the abdomen, chest, lower back, or groin area. The pain may be severe or dull. The occurrence of pain is often associated with the imminent (about to happen) rupture of the aneurysm.

Acute, sudden onset of severe pain in the back and/or abdomen may represent rupture and is a life-threatening medical emergency.

Abdominal aortic aneurysms may also cause a pulsing sensation, similar to a heartbeat, in the abdomen.

The symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm may resemble other medical conditions or problems. Always consult your physician for more information.

How are aneurysms diagnosed?

In addition to a complete medical history and physical examination, diagnostic procedures for an aneurysm may include any, or a combination, of the following:

  • Computed tomography (CT) scan.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
  • Ultrasound. 
  • Arteriogram (angiogram).

 

What is the treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms?

Specific treatment will be determined by your physician based on:

  • Your age, overall health, and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your signs and symptoms
  • Your tolerance of specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference

 

Treatment may include:

  • Controlling or modifying risk factors. Steps such as quitting smoking, controlling blood sugar if diabetic, losing weight if overweight or obese, and controlling dietary fat intake may help to control the progression of the aneurysm.
  • Medication. Medication can control factors such as hyperlipidemia (elevated levels of fats in the blood) and/or high blood pressure.
  • Surgery.

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair. A large incision is made in the abdomen to directly visualize the abdominal aorta and repair the aneurysm. A cylinder-like tube called a graft may be used to repair the aneurysm. Grafts are made of various materials such as Dacron (textile polyester synthetic graft) or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, non-textile synthetic graft). This graft is sewn to the aorta, connecting one end of the aorta at the site of the aneurysm to the other end. The open repair is considered the surgical standard for an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

  • Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). EVAR is a procedure that requires only small incisions in the groin along with the use of x-ray guidance and specially-designed instruments to repair the aneurysm. With the use of special endovascular instruments and x-ray images for guidance, a stent-graft is inserted via the femoral artery and advanced up into the aorta to the site of the aneurysm. A stent-graft is a long cylinder-like tube made of thin metal mesh framework (stent), while the graft is made of various materials such as Dacron or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The graft material may cover the stent. The stent helps to hold the graft open and in place. 

If the aneurysm is causing symptoms or is large, surgery may be recommended by your doctor. 

 
 


 
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